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Covid-19 has upended our lives. It’s revealed how vulnerable we all are, how fragile our lifestyles can be, and how essential it is to have savings. Whether you’ve personally been affected by job loss or salary cuts or financial insecurity, there’s no doubt that the pandemic has emphasised how devastating it can be to suddenly be out of work and out of money.

No wonder then that conversations abound when it comes to the importance of having an emergency fund.

Sometimes known as a rainy-day account, a ‘f*ck off’ fund, or a financial safety net, the emergency fund is ultimately there to give you security in turbulent times. This is also why financial advisors such as Carl Richards and Manisha Thakor call it an ‘uncertainty fund’ — after all, the amount you need to save is ultimately a response to how much uncertainty there is in your life. …


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When it comes to our money, social media is probably better known for getting us to spend it than to save or invest it.

After all, as we scroll through other people’s highlights reels, it can be hard not to be drawn into impulse buying and overspending. According to a poll commissioned by BBC Radio 5 Live and HuffPost UK, just over a third of millennials say that social media posts by influencers have made them spend money they otherwise would not have wanted to spend, whilst two in five (39%) said the same thing about targeted adverts.

“I think we’ve all been there, especially with Instagram,” says Kerry, “A friend shares the perfect shot of a white sandy beach, and oops, we find ourselves clicking through to British Airways. Another shares a story about a new cafe, so we book ourselves in the next night. Then you get the ads and they’re so weirdly specific like organic yoghurts or Scottish cashmere or the Calm app. You know, these algorithms are there to make us spend money.” …


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Ask anyone what their biggest money mistake is and there’s a very good chance that will be their answer.

In fact, when we spoke to people about the financial decisions that they regret the most, it quickly became clear that lending money to or borrowing from friends or family was one of the most common themes.

Emotionally fraught as talking about money can be, broaching the topic with those we care about can be complicated even before we get into issues like borrowing or lending. …


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Have you ever bought something you don’t really need? Maybe something you don’t even really want? Some spontaneous Percy Pigs at check out? A new jacket after a bad day? New books that you don’t have time to read but bought because you felt a need to buy even though you don’t entirely know why?

Personally, I’ve done all these things. Making purchases when I was stressed, lonely, bored or under-appreciated used to be quite commonplace. Especially when I worked right next to a Waterstones and honestly couldn’t resist going in almost every lunch break. I’ve also gone out and spent simply because I was happy. …


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When investing, you often hear the phrase “don’t put all your eggs in one basket”. So, what exactly do people mean by that?

The idea is that putting all of your money in one particular stock can be risky. This is because the value of the company you’ve bought shares in can go up or down. And if it goes down, your investments go down with it. The eggs that you bought with your hard-earned money may not survive the fall.

So what can you do? Well, one way to mitigate risk in investments is through portfolio diversification. …


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600 books were published in early September as part of a “Super Thursday” like none other. Super Thursday is the biggest publishing day of the year and has been since around 2008 — though it’s usually in October — and thanks to the pandemic there were more books than ever hitting the 2020 shelves in one go.

On the list were dozens of familiar names from Martin Amis and Caitlin Moran all the way through to Nayida Hussein, Laura Bates and Zoe Sommerville. …


Are you willing to pay more than others for your order of fries? Then, why pay more for wealth management?

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Today we’d like to talk about the price of wealth management using a analogy.

Let’s say you go to Five Guys (purely for the fries) and you’re waiting in the queue. The two people in front of you both order fries and they each pay £5 for their portion. Now you order and when it’s time to pay, you are charged £20 for the same portion of fries.

“This is outrageous!”, you say, and “How is this even allowed?”

The cashier explains their reasoning: “We have a policy of charging more to people who have more money. We know that you have more money in your bank account than the two customers before you. So, we decided to charge you more.” …


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Everyone has that friend who always seems to have the money to go out.

The pal who is constantly skint — you know because they tell you so — but somehow it doesn’t stop them.

They’re there for the parties and the dinners and the after-work drinks. They always have the latest dress or trainers or a new coat. They somehow seem to go on holiday all the time — but you know it’s not because they’re earning loads more than you are.

You’ve probably asked yourself at least once:

Perhaps they’re the savviest of us all — a bargain-hunter extraordinaire, so attuned to the latest deals or giveaways that it doesn’t matter what they make because they sniff out the special offers every time. …


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When lockdown began, many of us thought that it would be over in a few weeks. We had it in our heads that by summer we’d be back to normal.

As autumn approaches, our early optimism seems more like naivety. Whilst restrictions have eased over summer, we are all still adjusting, still learning to navigate this new world with its plethora of uncertainties and insecurities — not least when it comes to our money.

Many of us are looking for ideas on better ways to grow our savings, build our security nets, and make our money work for us, in the short and long-term. …


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Whether we like to admit or not, it’s true to say that many of our life goals are underpinned by the decisions we make with our money.

From our overdrafts to our choices in investment portfolios, financial products fuel our day to day lives. They empower and protect our futures, as well as those of our families and loved ones.

Think about it for a second — consider student loans and student bank accounts with free overdrafts; think about the credit cards that reward us for coupling up and the joint accounts that we’re advertised as acts of commitment; note all the products out there targeting first-time buyers and the pension schemes reminding us of retirement. …

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ikigai

Simple, intuitive banking and wealth management services in one app https://ikigai.money/

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